Sunday, April 20, 2014

Naming the Gowns - The Stories Behind the Names of Annie & Isabel's Designer Hospital Gowns

Naming the Gowns - The Stories Behind the Names of Annie & Isabel's Designer Hospital Gowns

SCRUBS.com | Scrub Hats and Medical Scrubs | Nursing Uniforms, Nursing Shoes | Stethoscopes and Accessories

SCRUBS.com | Scrub Hats and Medical Scrubs | Nursing Uniforms, Nursing Shoes | Stethoscopes and Accessories
My recent experiences with local medical care has prompted a bit of research and has inspired me to consider some 'Kitty Editorials'. After a few discussions with my Primary Care Physician, who informed me that what I am experiencing is a consequence of legislation designed to establish 'Guidelines' for hospitals, I have decided that I do not know enough about the situation. I begin with a fundamental notion: do no harm. I look to the evolution of the practice of medicine as a way to understand what it is that I should expect -- if anything at all -- and to understand what it is that I am experiencing, so I can come to understand why I am feeling unsteady on my feet with regard to the medical care I have been receiving recently and the associated communications episodes. My gut tells me (not too scientific, this gut thing) there must be some explanation. For example, my assumptions at this moment are that the people in the local hospital are performing jobs for which they were trained and that what I am experiencing is for hospital administrators an expected outcome of the policy of the institution, and it is designed to achieve these outcomes. Outcomes which I did not expect or anticipate. I anticipate that my 'Kitty Editorials' will take me through my own learning process -- so that I can come to understand what the above training is, and what the institutional policies are, that result in the outcomes I have experienced.
There are a few specific items I would like to explore in my 'Kitty Editorials'. One is a comment made by the VP of Nursing at the local hospital. When I asked her why I was not informed about the abnormal test results of the cultures even though I had called several times and attempted to obtain reports from the hospital for the tests they performed whereas I had believed and had been told that the doctor in the ER would see the report findings and I or my physician would be contacted about the findings, she replied, 'Nobody does that!' And she also said they never check to be certain the results have been received by the physicians or the patients. The 'send them' but they do not verify they have been received. She said only 'Critical Values' are reported. And only to physicians, not to nurse practitioners. So I'm wondering what part of an abnormal test result for a condition that requires treatment is not a 'Critical Value' and I will investigate. And I'm wondering why they accepted a prescription from my 'nurse practitioner' if they had a policy of not sending reports to a 'nurse practitioner'. (Makes me wonder why they expect me to see someone other than a Medical Doctor in their ER, too, if they do not take Nurse Practitioners seriously enough to send them a report of a test in response to a prescription. Meanwhile, they will accept the payment from Medicare for performing the test.) I can only assume this 'Nobody does that!' is consistent with the policies of the institution, and of her training. I have never found this kind of outcome to be the case in Switzerland. Whenever a finding of a test is abnormal, I receive the information immediately, even before I leave the testing facility. Most impressive is the private hospital in Zurich. Klinik Im Park. When I come out of the dressing room from the CT scan procedure, the Radiologist is waiting for me to explain the findings and hands me a report, a CD, and informs me he has already spoken with my physician. If there is a more complex finding, the discussion might be longer, and I might have to wait in the nice waiting room sipping espresso for ten minutes before I see the Radiologist who will inform me how much time will be required to come to a conclusion about the findings if not at that moment. And it's cheap enough that I can pay for it on my debit card without fear. Or they'll just send me a bill. In the case of a culture, I receive the information directly from the physician within moments of the time the test has been completed and recorded or posted in the electronic system. I can see the dates and times. I cannot imagine medicine is so very different in Switzerland than it is in the United States of America. Surely the people in the United States are not lacking for talented systems designers. Or talented physicians. I hear all the time how we have the best system in the world.
I will investigate the situation.
Another situation I will investigate is the fact I was billed for a Medical Doctor when I saw a Physician's Assistant. Which appears again to be consistent with the policies of the institution and training of the staff, and which appears to be inconsistent with what I have read on the CMS website with regard to Medicare Policies. I will investigate this situation.
I do not want to jump to any conclusions about why these 'policies' and 'training' reveal themselves in the way I have experienced recently. I certainly hope that I am not experiencing some kind of policy 'slow down' or 'job action' or 'sit in' to make a point about unwanted 'government interference' in medical matters. Those are big issues. Tilting at Windmills issues. I personally respond in this way because I try to be as prepared as I can for any situation I might encounter. For example, I realize the local hospital does not provide emesis basins, and if I have plans to vomit, I just bring along my own ziploc bags. No Problem. Right? Don't bother to complain any more; just solve the problem for Kitty. (People I know are giving me advice to just worry about myself. So now 'it's all about me me me.' HAHAHA!) But I am now so confused about all these other matters that I cannot anticipate any method at all that I can use to avoid problems. Even just to advocate for 'me me me'. It makes me feel incredibly unsteady on my feet. We all know how uncomfortable that makes Kitties. And that's what inspires me to go back to the drawing board and learn more about the situation. More in future.

Declaration of Geneva - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Declaration of Geneva - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia